NVIDIA accepting applications for Graduate Fellowship Program

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NVIDIA has launched its 16th Annual Graduate Fellowship Program, which awards grants and technical support to graduate students who are doing outstanding GPU-based research.

This year NVIDIA is especially seeking doctoral students pushing the envelope in artificial intelligence, deep neural networks, autonomous vehicles, and related fields. The Graduate Fellowship awards are now up to $50,000 per student. These grants will be awarded in the 2017-2018 academic year.

Since its inception in 2002, the NVIDIA Graduate Fellowship Program has awarded over 130 Ph.D. graduate students with grants that have helped accelerate their research efforts.

The NVIDIA Graduate Fellowship Program is open to applicants worldwide. The deadline for submitting applications is Jan. 16, 2017. Eligible graduate students will have already completed their first year of Ph.D. level studies in the areas of computer science, computer engineering, system architecture, electrical engineering or a related area. In addition, applicants must also be engaged in active research as part of their thesis work.

For more information on eligibility and how to apply, visit http://research.nvidia.com/relevant/graduate-fellowship-program or email fellowship@nvidia.com.

Blue Waters accepting proposals for allocations, fellowships, and undergrad internships

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The GLCPC (Great Lakes Consortium for Petascale Computation) recently posted its call for proposals. Researchers from member institutions (including the University of Michigan) are eligible to apply for a Blue Waters allocation.  The application deadline is Friday, December 2nd.  More information can be found at: http://www.greatlakesconsortium.org/2016cfp.htm

Applications are also being accepted for Blue Waters Fellowships. Applications are due February 3, 2017. More information is available at: https://bluewaters.ncsa.illinois.edu/fellowships

Applications are now being accepted for Blue Waters undergraduate internships. Applications are due February 3, 2017.  More information is available at: https://bluewaters.ncsa.illinois.edu/internships

HPC User Meetups set for October, November and December

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Users of high performance computing resources are invited to meet ARC-TS HPC operators and support staff in person at an upcoming user meeting:

  • Monday, October 17, 1:10 – 5 p.m., 2001 LSA Building (500 S. State St.)
  • Wednesday, November 9, 1 – 5 p.m., 1180 Duderstadt Center (2281 Bonisteel Blvd., North Campus)
  • Monday, December 12, 1 – 5 p.m., 4515 Biomedical Science Research Building (BSRB, 109 Zina Pitcher Pl.)

There is not a set agenda; come at anytime and stay as long as you please. You can come and talk about your use of any sort of computational resource, Flux, Armis, Hadoop, XSEDE, Amazon, or other.

Ask any questions you may have. The ARC-TS staff will work with you on your specific projects, or just show you new things that can help you optimize your research.

This is also a good time to meet other researchers doing similar work.

This is open to anyone interested; it is not limited to Flux users.

Examples of potential topics:

  • What ARC-TS services are there, and how to access them?
  • I want to do X, do you have software capable of it?
  • What is special about GPU/Xeon Phi/Accelerators?
  • Are there resources for people without budgets?
  • I want to apply for grant X, but it has certain limitations. What support can ARC-TS provide?
  • I want to learn more about the compiler and debugging?
  • I want to learn more about performance tuning, can you look at my code with me?
  • Etc.

Dr. Greg Wilson, founder of Software Carpentry, to speak on U-M campus Oct. 12-13

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The founder of Software Carpentry, Dr. Greg Wilson, will be on the U-M campus to give two public talks. Over the past 18 years, The Software and Data Carpentry organizations have sought to improve the data analysis and computing skills of researchers around the world. The organizations’ materials are developed collaboratively under the Creative Commons-Attribution license and taught by hundreds of trained volunteer instructors. Dr. Wilson will present two talks that you are invited to attend. Both talks will be in the Clark Library presentation space on the second floor of Hatcher South:

“Software Carpentry: Lessons Learned”
1:00 pm on Wednesday, 10/12, Clark Library
Since its start in 1998, Software Carpentry has evolved from a week-long training course at the US national laboratories into aworldwide volunteer effort to improve researchers’ computing skills. This talk will explore the lessons we’ve learned along the way about applying open source software development techniques to teaching at scale, and about getting people and institutions to change the way they work.

“Not on the Shelves: What Nonexistent Books, Tools, and Courses Can Tell Us About Ourselves”
11 am on Thursday, 10/13, Clark Library
Hundreds of books about writing compilers are currently on the market, but there are only three about writing debuggers. Spreadsheets are used to do calculations more often than every other kind of tool combined, but thirty-five years after their invention, version control systems still can’t handle them. Everyone thinks we should teach children how to program, but undergraduate courses on computing education are practically nonexistent.  This talk will explore what
these gaps in our books, tools, and courses tell us about the state of computing today, and about what it could look like tomorrow.

For more information: pschloss@umich.edu

Globus 101 webinar scheduled for Oct. 6

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The OU Supercomputing Center for Education & Research (OSCER) is hosting a webinar on managing research data with Globus. Globus is software-as-a-service for research data management and provides high speed, secure file transfer; file sharing directly from existing stage systems; and data publication to institutional repositories. Developed and operated by the University of Chicago, Globus has become a preferred service for moving and sharing data between and among a wide variety of storage systems at research labs, campus computing resources, and national facilities across the US. In this session, you will learn about the features of the Globus service, and how to use it to streamline your research data flows. The webinar will help you answer these questions: How can Globus help me overcome the challenges I face in moving increasingly “big” datasets? How can I share data with collaborators at other institutions more efficiently? How can I use Globus to more easily leverage large-scale computing resources, both on campus and beyond? The presentation is aimed at those new to Globus, but attendees with prior Globus experience may also benefit by learning about new and planned features.

For more information and to register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/ou-globus-101-webinar-tickets-27272257055

New geospatial analysis and GIS support at CSCAR

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CSCAR (Consulting for Statistics, Computing and Analytics Research) is offering expanded support for geospatial analysis and geographic information systems (GIS), effective immediately.

Researchers seeking guidance in this area are encouraged to schedule an appointment by calling 764-7828.

Several members of the CSCAR staff have expertise in modeling and analysis of geospatial data, and can provide consultations on basic and advanced methods. A variety of tools including R, Matlab, Python, and Arc-GIS are supported for work in this area. The CSCAR team was recently joined by a consultant holding a PhD in Earth/Environment Sciences, specializing in GIS and remote sensing.

As a result, CSCAR is now able to support a broad range of geospatial analysis activities including GIS, geostatistics, mechanistic modeling, geospatial visualization, and large-scale geospatial data processing on Flux and other advanced infrastructure systems. New workshops in Arc-GIS and other geospatial tools will begin in November (details will appear on this website).

Graduate programs in computational and data science — informational sessions Sept. 19 & 21

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Students interested in computational and data science are invited to learn about graduate programs that will prepare them for success in computationally intensive fields. Pizza and pop will be provided.

Two sessions are scheduled:

Monday, Sept. 19, 5 – 6 p.m.
Johnson Rooms, Lurie Engineering Center (North Campus)

Wednesday, Sept. 21, 5 – 6 p.m.
2001 LSA Building (Central Campus)

The sessions will address:

  • The Ph.D. in Scientific Computing, which is open to all Ph.D. students who will make extensive use of large-scale computation, computational methods, or algorithms for advanced computer architectures in their studies. It is a joint degree program, with students earning a Ph.D. from their current departments, “… and Scientific Computing” — for example, “Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering and Scientific Computing.”
  • The Graduate Certificate in Computational Discovery and Engineering, which trains graduate students in computationally intensive research so they can excel in interdisciplinary HPC-focused research and product development environments. The certificate is open to all students currently pursuing Master’s or Ph.D. degrees at the University of Michigan. This year we will offer a new practicum option through the Multidisciplinary Design Program.
  • The Graduate Certificate in Data Science, which is focused on developing core proficiencies in data analytics:
    1) Modeling — Understanding of core data science principles, assumptions and applications;
    2) Technology — Knowledge of basic protocols for data management, processing, computation, information extraction, and visualization;
    3) Practice — Hands-on experience with real data, modeling tools, and technology resources.

MICDE Fall 2016 Seminar Series speakers announced

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The Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering (MICDE) is proud to announce its fall lineup of seminar speakers. In cooperation with academic departments across campus, the seminar series brings nationally recognized speakers to campus.

This fall’s speakers are:

Sept. 13: Nathan Kutz, Professor of Applied Mathematics, University of Washington

Sept. 22: Rob Gardner, Senior Scientist at the Computation Institute, University of Chicago

Sept. 29: Jeremy Lichstein, Assistant Professor of Biology, University of Florida

Oct. 6: Jonathan Freund, Professor of Mechanical Science and Engineering and of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Oct. 14: Anthony Wachs, Assistant Professor of Mathematics and of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of British Columbia

Oct. 26: Andrea Lodi, Professor of Mathematical and Industrial Engineering, Polytechnique Montreal

Nov. 11: David Higdon, Professor of the Biocomplexity Institute, Virginia Tech

Dec. 9: Ann Almgren, Staff Scientist at the Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories

For more information, including links to bios and abstracts as available, please visit micde.umich.edu/seminar-series/.

Students in the Graduate Certificate in Computational Discovery and Engineering program are required to attend at least half of the seminars.

Registration open for on-campus telecast of XSEDE workshop on MPI — Sept. 7-8

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U-M is hosting a telecast of a workshop on MPI (message passing interface) presented by XSEDE and the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center.

This workshop is intended to give C and Fortran programmers a hands-on introduction to MPI programming. Attendees will leave with a working knowledge of how to write scalable codes using MPI – the standard programming tool of scalable parallel computing.

Time/Date: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Eastern, Wednesday, Sept. 7 and Thursday, Sept. 8

Location: Room B003E, North Campus Research Complex (NCRC), Building 16, 2800 Plymouth Rd.

Registration: Registration is required through the XSEDE website (you must create an XSEDE user account to register). Space is limited.

More information: Class website.

Contact: Simon Adorf (csadorf@umich.edu)