Workshop co-chaired by MIDAS co-director Prof. Hero releases proceedings on inference in big data

By | Al Hero, Educational, General Interest, Research | No Comments

The National Academies Committee on Applied and Theoretical Statistics has released proceedings from its June 2016 workshop titled “Refining the Concept of Scientific Inference When Working with Big Data,” co-chaired by Alfred Hero, MIDAS co-director and the John H Holland Distinguished University Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

The report can be downloaded from the National Academies website.

The workshop explored four key issues in scientific inference:

  • Inference about causal discoveries driven by large observational data
  • Inference about discoveries from data on large networks
  • Inference about discoveries based on integration of diverse datasets
  • Inference when regularization is used to simplify fitting of high-dimensional models.

The workshop brought together statisticians, data scientists and domain researchers from different biomedical disciplines in order to identify new methodological developments that hold significant promise, and to highlight potential research areas for the future. It was partially funded by the National Institutes of Health Big Data to Knowledge Program, and the National Science Foundation Division of Mathematical Sciences.

NVIDIA, IBM info session on new technology for HPC & life science research — Jan 24

By | Educational, General Interest, News | No Comments

Join us for a special IBM High Performance Computing event with NVIDIA!

Dramatic shifts in the information technology industry offer new kinds of performance capabilities and throughput. Professionals in HPC, Deep Learning, Big Data Analytics and Life Sciences are cordially invited to learn more about industry trends & directions and IT solutions from NVIDIA and IBM.

PRESENTORS

  • Brad Davidson – NVIDIA Senior Solutions Architect
  • Janis Landry-Lane – IBM Worldwide Program Director for Genomic Medicine
  • Jane Yu – IBM Worldwide Team Lead, Translational Medicine Solutions

For more information, visit our event page.

Webinar: Writing a Successful XSEDE Allocation Proposal — Jan. 5

By | Educational, General Interest, News | No Comments

The Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) will introduce users to the process of writing an XSEDE allocation proposal and cover the elements that make a proposal successful. This webinar is recommended for users making the jump from a startup allocation to a research allocation and is highly recommended for new campus champions.

Registration: https://www.xsede.org/web/xup/course-calendar

Please submit any questions you may have via the Consulting section of the XSEDE User Portal.

https://portal.xsede.org/help-desk

NVIDIA accepting applications for Graduate Fellowship Program

By | Educational, Funding Opportunities, General Interest, News | No Comments

NVIDIA has launched its 16th Annual Graduate Fellowship Program, which awards grants and technical support to graduate students who are doing outstanding GPU-based research.

This year NVIDIA is especially seeking doctoral students pushing the envelope in artificial intelligence, deep neural networks, autonomous vehicles, and related fields. The Graduate Fellowship awards are now up to $50,000 per student. These grants will be awarded in the 2017-2018 academic year.

Since its inception in 2002, the NVIDIA Graduate Fellowship Program has awarded over 130 Ph.D. graduate students with grants that have helped accelerate their research efforts.

The NVIDIA Graduate Fellowship Program is open to applicants worldwide. The deadline for submitting applications is Jan. 16, 2017. Eligible graduate students will have already completed their first year of Ph.D. level studies in the areas of computer science, computer engineering, system architecture, electrical engineering or a related area. In addition, applicants must also be engaged in active research as part of their thesis work.

For more information on eligibility and how to apply, visit http://research.nvidia.com/relevant/graduate-fellowship-program or email fellowship@nvidia.com.

Blue Waters accepting proposals for allocations, fellowships, and undergrad internships

By | Educational, General Interest, News | No Comments

The GLCPC (Great Lakes Consortium for Petascale Computation) recently posted its call for proposals. Researchers from member institutions (including the University of Michigan) are eligible to apply for a Blue Waters allocation.  The application deadline is Friday, December 2nd.  More information can be found at: http://www.greatlakesconsortium.org/2016cfp.htm

Applications are also being accepted for Blue Waters Fellowships. Applications are due February 3, 2017. More information is available at: https://bluewaters.ncsa.illinois.edu/fellowships

Applications are now being accepted for Blue Waters undergraduate internships. Applications are due February 3, 2017.  More information is available at: https://bluewaters.ncsa.illinois.edu/internships

HPC User Meetups set for October, November and December

By | Educational, Events, General Interest | No Comments

Users of high performance computing resources are invited to meet ARC-TS HPC operators and support staff in person at an upcoming user meeting:

  • Monday, October 17, 1:10 – 5 p.m., 2001 LSA Building (500 S. State St.)
  • Wednesday, November 9, 1 – 5 p.m., 1180 Duderstadt Center (2281 Bonisteel Blvd., North Campus)
  • Monday, December 12, 1 – 5 p.m., 4515 Biomedical Science Research Building (BSRB, 109 Zina Pitcher Pl.)

There is not a set agenda; come at anytime and stay as long as you please. You can come and talk about your use of any sort of computational resource, Flux, Armis, Hadoop, XSEDE, Amazon, or other.

Ask any questions you may have. The ARC-TS staff will work with you on your specific projects, or just show you new things that can help you optimize your research.

This is also a good time to meet other researchers doing similar work.

This is open to anyone interested; it is not limited to Flux users.

Examples of potential topics:

  • What ARC-TS services are there, and how to access them?
  • I want to do X, do you have software capable of it?
  • What is special about GPU/Xeon Phi/Accelerators?
  • Are there resources for people without budgets?
  • I want to apply for grant X, but it has certain limitations. What support can ARC-TS provide?
  • I want to learn more about the compiler and debugging?
  • I want to learn more about performance tuning, can you look at my code with me?
  • Etc.

Dr. Greg Wilson, founder of Software Carpentry, to speak on U-M campus Oct. 12-13

By | Educational, Events, General Interest, Happenings | No Comments

The founder of Software Carpentry, Dr. Greg Wilson, will be on the U-M campus to give two public talks. Over the past 18 years, The Software and Data Carpentry organizations have sought to improve the data analysis and computing skills of researchers around the world. The organizations’ materials are developed collaboratively under the Creative Commons-Attribution license and taught by hundreds of trained volunteer instructors. Dr. Wilson will present two talks that you are invited to attend. Both talks will be in the Clark Library presentation space on the second floor of Hatcher South:

“Software Carpentry: Lessons Learned”
1:00 pm on Wednesday, 10/12, Clark Library
Since its start in 1998, Software Carpentry has evolved from a week-long training course at the US national laboratories into aworldwide volunteer effort to improve researchers’ computing skills. This talk will explore the lessons we’ve learned along the way about applying open source software development techniques to teaching at scale, and about getting people and institutions to change the way they work.

“Not on the Shelves: What Nonexistent Books, Tools, and Courses Can Tell Us About Ourselves”
11 am on Thursday, 10/13, Clark Library
Hundreds of books about writing compilers are currently on the market, but there are only three about writing debuggers. Spreadsheets are used to do calculations more often than every other kind of tool combined, but thirty-five years after their invention, version control systems still can’t handle them. Everyone thinks we should teach children how to program, but undergraduate courses on computing education are practically nonexistent.  This talk will explore what
these gaps in our books, tools, and courses tell us about the state of computing today, and about what it could look like tomorrow.

For more information: pschloss@umich.edu

Globus 101 webinar scheduled for Oct. 6

By | Educational, Events, General Interest, News | No Comments

The OU Supercomputing Center for Education & Research (OSCER) is hosting a webinar on managing research data with Globus. Globus is software-as-a-service for research data management and provides high speed, secure file transfer; file sharing directly from existing stage systems; and data publication to institutional repositories. Developed and operated by the University of Chicago, Globus has become a preferred service for moving and sharing data between and among a wide variety of storage systems at research labs, campus computing resources, and national facilities across the US. In this session, you will learn about the features of the Globus service, and how to use it to streamline your research data flows. The webinar will help you answer these questions: How can Globus help me overcome the challenges I face in moving increasingly “big” datasets? How can I share data with collaborators at other institutions more efficiently? How can I use Globus to more easily leverage large-scale computing resources, both on campus and beyond? The presentation is aimed at those new to Globus, but attendees with prior Globus experience may also benefit by learning about new and planned features.

For more information and to register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/ou-globus-101-webinar-tickets-27272257055

New geospatial analysis and GIS support at CSCAR

By | Educational, General Interest, News | No Comments

CSCAR (Consulting for Statistics, Computing and Analytics Research) is offering expanded support for geospatial analysis and geographic information systems (GIS), effective immediately.

Researchers seeking guidance in this area are encouraged to schedule an appointment by calling 764-7828.

Several members of the CSCAR staff have expertise in modeling and analysis of geospatial data, and can provide consultations on basic and advanced methods. A variety of tools including R, Matlab, Python, and Arc-GIS are supported for work in this area. The CSCAR team was recently joined by a consultant holding a PhD in Earth/Environment Sciences, specializing in GIS and remote sensing.

As a result, CSCAR is now able to support a broad range of geospatial analysis activities including GIS, geostatistics, mechanistic modeling, geospatial visualization, and large-scale geospatial data processing on Flux and other advanced infrastructure systems. New workshops in Arc-GIS and other geospatial tools will begin in November (details will appear on this website).