Dr. Greg Wilson, founder of Software Carpentry, to speak on U-M campus Oct. 12-13

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The founder of Software Carpentry, Dr. Greg Wilson, will be on the U-M campus to give two public talks. Over the past 18 years, The Software and Data Carpentry organizations have sought to improve the data analysis and computing skills of researchers around the world. The organizations’ materials are developed collaboratively under the Creative Commons-Attribution license and taught by hundreds of trained volunteer instructors. Dr. Wilson will present two talks that you are invited to attend. Both talks will be in the Clark Library presentation space on the second floor of Hatcher South:

“Software Carpentry: Lessons Learned”
1:00 pm on Wednesday, 10/12, Clark Library
Since its start in 1998, Software Carpentry has evolved from a week-long training course at the US national laboratories into aworldwide volunteer effort to improve researchers’ computing skills. This talk will explore the lessons we’ve learned along the way about applying open source software development techniques to teaching at scale, and about getting people and institutions to change the way they work.

“Not on the Shelves: What Nonexistent Books, Tools, and Courses Can Tell Us About Ourselves”
11 am on Thursday, 10/13, Clark Library
Hundreds of books about writing compilers are currently on the market, but there are only three about writing debuggers. Spreadsheets are used to do calculations more often than every other kind of tool combined, but thirty-five years after their invention, version control systems still can’t handle them. Everyone thinks we should teach children how to program, but undergraduate courses on computing education are practically nonexistent.  This talk will explore what
these gaps in our books, tools, and courses tell us about the state of computing today, and about what it could look like tomorrow.

For more information: pschloss@umich.edu

Globus 101 webinar scheduled for Oct. 6

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The OU Supercomputing Center for Education & Research (OSCER) is hosting a webinar on managing research data with Globus. Globus is software-as-a-service for research data management and provides high speed, secure file transfer; file sharing directly from existing stage systems; and data publication to institutional repositories. Developed and operated by the University of Chicago, Globus has become a preferred service for moving and sharing data between and among a wide variety of storage systems at research labs, campus computing resources, and national facilities across the US. In this session, you will learn about the features of the Globus service, and how to use it to streamline your research data flows. The webinar will help you answer these questions: How can Globus help me overcome the challenges I face in moving increasingly “big” datasets? How can I share data with collaborators at other institutions more efficiently? How can I use Globus to more easily leverage large-scale computing resources, both on campus and beyond? The presentation is aimed at those new to Globus, but attendees with prior Globus experience may also benefit by learning about new and planned features.

For more information and to register: https://www.eventbrite.com/e/ou-globus-101-webinar-tickets-27272257055

Graduate programs in computational and data science — informational sessions Sept. 19 & 21

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Students interested in computational and data science are invited to learn about graduate programs that will prepare them for success in computationally intensive fields. Pizza and pop will be provided.

Two sessions are scheduled:

Monday, Sept. 19, 5 – 6 p.m.
Johnson Rooms, Lurie Engineering Center (North Campus)

Wednesday, Sept. 21, 5 – 6 p.m.
2001 LSA Building (Central Campus)

The sessions will address:

  • The Ph.D. in Scientific Computing, which is open to all Ph.D. students who will make extensive use of large-scale computation, computational methods, or algorithms for advanced computer architectures in their studies. It is a joint degree program, with students earning a Ph.D. from their current departments, “… and Scientific Computing” — for example, “Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering and Scientific Computing.”
  • The Graduate Certificate in Computational Discovery and Engineering, which trains graduate students in computationally intensive research so they can excel in interdisciplinary HPC-focused research and product development environments. The certificate is open to all students currently pursuing Master’s or Ph.D. degrees at the University of Michigan. This year we will offer a new practicum option through the Multidisciplinary Design Program.
  • The Graduate Certificate in Data Science, which is focused on developing core proficiencies in data analytics:
    1) Modeling — Understanding of core data science principles, assumptions and applications;
    2) Technology — Knowledge of basic protocols for data management, processing, computation, information extraction, and visualization;
    3) Practice — Hands-on experience with real data, modeling tools, and technology resources.

MICDE Fall 2016 Seminar Series speakers announced

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The Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering (MICDE) is proud to announce its fall lineup of seminar speakers. In cooperation with academic departments across campus, the seminar series brings nationally recognized speakers to campus.

This fall’s speakers are:

Sept. 13: Nathan Kutz, Professor of Applied Mathematics, University of Washington

Sept. 22: Rob Gardner, Senior Scientist at the Computation Institute, University of Chicago

Sept. 29: Jeremy Lichstein, Assistant Professor of Biology, University of Florida

Oct. 6: Jonathan Freund, Professor of Mechanical Science and Engineering and of Aerospace Engineering, University of Illinois, Urbana-Champaign

Oct. 14: Anthony Wachs, Assistant Professor of Mathematics and of Chemical and Biological Engineering, University of British Columbia

Oct. 26: Andrea Lodi, Professor of Mathematical and Industrial Engineering, Polytechnique Montreal

Nov. 11: David Higdon, Professor of the Biocomplexity Institute, Virginia Tech

Dec. 9: Ann Almgren, Staff Scientist at the Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering, Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratories

For more information, including links to bios and abstracts as available, please visit micde.umich.edu/seminar-series/.

Students in the Graduate Certificate in Computational Discovery and Engineering program are required to attend at least half of the seminars.

Registration open for on-campus telecast of XSEDE workshop on MPI — Sept. 7-8

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U-M is hosting a telecast of a workshop on MPI (message passing interface) presented by XSEDE and the Pittsburgh Supercomputing Center.

This workshop is intended to give C and Fortran programmers a hands-on introduction to MPI programming. Attendees will leave with a working knowledge of how to write scalable codes using MPI – the standard programming tool of scalable parallel computing.

Time/Date: 11 a.m. to 5 p.m. Eastern, Wednesday, Sept. 7 and Thursday, Sept. 8

Location: Room B003E, North Campus Research Complex (NCRC), Building 16, 2800 Plymouth Rd.

Registration: Registration is required through the XSEDE website (you must create an XSEDE user account to register). Space is limited.

More information: Class website.

Contact: Simon Adorf (csadorf@umich.edu)

Software Carpentry workshop at U-M — May 2-3

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A Software Carpentry workshop will be held at the U-M Medical School May 2 and 3. These workshops are free and open to anyone on campus; the sessions are suitable for researchers in the humanities and social sciences. Register here.

This hands-on workshop will cover basic concepts and tools, including program design, version control, data management, and task automation. Participants will be encouraged to help one another and to apply what they have learned to their own research problems.

Who: The course is aimed at graduate students, postdocs, and other researchers across the University of Michigan. You don’t need to have any previous knowledge of the tools that will be presented at the workshop.

Where: Furstenberg 2710 (2nd floor of Med Sci II).

Registration open for MICDE Symposium — April 7

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The Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering (MICDE) Annual Symposium will take place April 7 in the Rackham Building on U-M’s Central Campus. Space is limited. Please register using this form.

The symposium will feature an outstanding group of speakers:

  • Irene Qualters, Director, NSF Division of Advanced Cyberinfrastructure
  • Linda Petzold, 2016 SIAM awardee, Professor of Computational Science and Engineering, University of California, Santa Barbara
  • Mark Taylor, DOE Secretary’s Honor Award winner 2014, Chief Computational Scientist, Accelerated Climate Modeling for Energy, Sandia National Laboratory
  • James Sethian, AMS/SIAM Norbert Wiener Prize winner, Department of Mathematics, University of California, Berkeley
  • Zoltan Cendes, Co-Founder (retired) of Ansoft Corp. (now part of ANSYS)
  • Talks featuring some of the most compelling new research by U-M faculty: Ann Jeffers, Civil and Environmental Engineering; Shravan Veerapaneni, Mathematics; and Alberto Figueroa, Biomedical Engineering and Vascular Surgery.

The symposium will also include a poster session highlighting outstanding computational work from U-M researchers and students. To participate in the poster session, please fill out this form.

Visit the symposium website for a complete agenda.

CSCAR Data Science Skills Series on Python offers sessions on advanced regression analysis, Sklearn, and Statsmodels

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CSCAR will offer a series of workshops on data science skills using Python. The workshops will be held in the Earl Lewis room in the Rackham building. All workshops will take place on Wednesday afternoons from 3:30-5.

The workshops are free and no registration is necessary.

We assume that participants are already familiar with basic Python. People with no experience using Python but who are comfortable using languages such as R or Matlab should also be able to follow the presentations.

Feel free to bring a laptop, but it is not required.

See the skills series website for more information and workshop materials.

Dept. of Statistics sponsoring data mining competition for undergraduates

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The Department of Statistics is sponsoring a data mining competition that will be open to all U-M undergraduates.  Cash prizes will be awarded: $500/1st place, $300/2nd place, $200/3rd place.
Teams and individuals are welcome to participate A dataset will be made available on Monday, March 21st and submissions must be made by 9 a.m. on Monday, April 11th.
Each team will produce a written analysis of the provided dataset, focusing on a specific question that will be announced when the dataset is released.  A variety of tools and techniques will be suitable for this task — students from various academic backgrounds focusing on data analytics and computing will be well equipped for the competition.  See kshedden.github.io/data_mining_2016 for more information to be posted on March 21st.