Workshop co-chaired by MIDAS co-director Prof. Hero releases proceedings on inference in big data

By | Al Hero, Educational, General Interest, Research | No Comments

The National Academies Committee on Applied and Theoretical Statistics has released proceedings from its June 2016 workshop titled “Refining the Concept of Scientific Inference When Working with Big Data,” co-chaired by Alfred Hero, MIDAS co-director and the John H Holland Distinguished University Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science.

The report can be downloaded from the National Academies website.

The workshop explored four key issues in scientific inference:

  • Inference about causal discoveries driven by large observational data
  • Inference about discoveries from data on large networks
  • Inference about discoveries based on integration of diverse datasets
  • Inference when regularization is used to simplify fitting of high-dimensional models.

The workshop brought together statisticians, data scientists and domain researchers from different biomedical disciplines in order to identify new methodological developments that hold significant promise, and to highlight potential research areas for the future. It was partially funded by the National Institutes of Health Big Data to Knowledge Program, and the National Science Foundation Division of Mathematical Sciences.

Application container software installed on Flux and Armis

By | General Interest, News | No Comments

Singularity, which is new “application container” software, has been installed on the Flux and Armis HPC clusters. An application container is a program — a single file — that can be used to combine an application with the system software it needs to run. This enables applications to run on the clusters even if the system software is different. For example, an older application that is needed to finish a project can continue to be used even if it is incompatible with the updated cluster. An application that needs a different Linux distribution can be containerized to run on the cluster.

Singularity containers cannot be created on Flux or Armis, but they can be created and brought to the clusters to run.  Singularity provides tools to convert Docker containers for use on Flux and Armis. Please contact hpc-support@umich.edu if you are interested in using Singularity and would like more information about how to create and run Singularity containers or would like a referral to unit support who can help.

Information about Singularity on Flux and Armis can be found at http://arc-ts.umich.edu/software/singularity and about Singularity itself at http://singularity.lbl.gov/

Combining simulation and experimentation yields complex crystal nanoparticle

By | General Interest, News, Research | No Comments

The most complex crystal designed and built from nanoparticles has been reported by researchers at Northwestern University and the University of Michigan. The work demonstrates that some of nature’s most complicated structures can be deliberately assembled if researchers can control the shapes of the particles and the way they connect using DNA.

The U-M researcher is Sharon C. Glotzer, the John W. Cahn Distinguished University Professor of Engineering and the Stuart W. Churchill Collegiate Professor of Chemical Engineering. The work is published in the March 3 issue of Science. ARC’s computational resources supported the work.

NVIDIA, IBM info session on new technology for HPC & life science research — Jan 24

By | Educational, General Interest, News | No Comments

Join us for a special IBM High Performance Computing event with NVIDIA!

Dramatic shifts in the information technology industry offer new kinds of performance capabilities and throughput. Professionals in HPC, Deep Learning, Big Data Analytics and Life Sciences are cordially invited to learn more about industry trends & directions and IT solutions from NVIDIA and IBM.

PRESENTORS

  • Brad Davidson – NVIDIA Senior Solutions Architect
  • Janis Landry-Lane – IBM Worldwide Program Director for Genomic Medicine
  • Jane Yu – IBM Worldwide Team Lead, Translational Medicine Solutions

For more information, visit our event page.

Webinar: Writing a Successful XSEDE Allocation Proposal — Jan. 5

By | Educational, General Interest, News | No Comments

The Extreme Science and Engineering Discovery Environment (XSEDE) will introduce users to the process of writing an XSEDE allocation proposal and cover the elements that make a proposal successful. This webinar is recommended for users making the jump from a startup allocation to a research allocation and is highly recommended for new campus champions.

Registration: https://www.xsede.org/web/xup/course-calendar

Please submit any questions you may have via the Consulting section of the XSEDE User Portal.

https://portal.xsede.org/help-desk

Video, slides available from U-M presentations at SC16

By | Events, General Interest, News | No Comments

Several University of Michigan researchers and research IT staff made presentations at the SC16 conference in Salt Lake City Nov. 13-17. Material from many of the talks is now available for viewing online:

  • Shawn McKee (Physics) and Ben Meekhof (ARC-TS) presented a demonstration of the Open Storage Research Infrastructure (OSiRIS) project at the U-M booth. The demonstration extended the OSiRIS network from its participating institutions in Michigan to the conference center in Utah. Meekhof also presented at a”Birds of a Feather” session on Ceph in HPC environments. More information, including slides, is available on the OSiRIS website.
  • Todd Raeker (ARC-TS) made a presentation on ConFlux, U-M’s new computational physics cluster, at the NVIDIA booth. Slides and video are available.
  • Nilmini Abeyratne, a Ph.D student in computer science, presented her project “Low Design-Risk Checkpointing Storage Solution for Exascale Supercomputers” at the Doctoral Showcase. A summary, slides, and poster can be viewed on the SC16 website.
  • Jeremy Hallum (ARC-TS) presented information on the Yottabyte Research Cloud at the U-M booth. His slides are available here.

Other U-M activity at the conference included Sharon Broude Geva, Director of Advanced Research Computing, participating in a panel titled “HPC Workforce Development: How Do We Find Them, Recruit Them, and Teach Them to Be Today’s Practitioners and Tomorrow’s Leaders?”; Quentin Stout (EECS) and Christiane Jablonowski (CLASP) teaching the “Parallel Computing 101” tutorial.

HPC maintenance scheduled for January 7 – 9

By | Flux, General Interest, News | No Comments

To accommodate upgrades to software and operating systems, Flux, Armis, and their storage systems (/home and /scratch) will be unavailable starting at 9am Saturday, January 7th, returning to service on Monday, January 9th.  Additionally, external Turbo mounts will be unavailable 11pm Saturday, January 7th, until 7am Sunday, January 8th.

During this time, the following updates are planned:

  • Operating system and software updates (minor updates) on Flux and Armis.  This should not require any changes to user software or processes.
  • Resource manager and job scheduling software updates.
  • Operating system updates on Turbo.

For HPC jobs, you can use the command “maxwalltime” to discover the amount of time before the beginning of the maintenance. Jobs that cannot complete prior to the beginning of the maintenance will be able to start when the clusters are returned to service.

We will post status updates on our Twitter feed ( https://twitter.com/arcts_um ) and send an email to all HPC users when the outage has been completed.

NVIDIA accepting applications for Graduate Fellowship Program

By | Educational, Funding Opportunities, General Interest, News | No Comments

NVIDIA has launched its 16th Annual Graduate Fellowship Program, which awards grants and technical support to graduate students who are doing outstanding GPU-based research.

This year NVIDIA is especially seeking doctoral students pushing the envelope in artificial intelligence, deep neural networks, autonomous vehicles, and related fields. The Graduate Fellowship awards are now up to $50,000 per student. These grants will be awarded in the 2017-2018 academic year.

Since its inception in 2002, the NVIDIA Graduate Fellowship Program has awarded over 130 Ph.D. graduate students with grants that have helped accelerate their research efforts.

The NVIDIA Graduate Fellowship Program is open to applicants worldwide. The deadline for submitting applications is Jan. 16, 2017. Eligible graduate students will have already completed their first year of Ph.D. level studies in the areas of computer science, computer engineering, system architecture, electrical engineering or a related area. In addition, applicants must also be engaged in active research as part of their thesis work.

For more information on eligibility and how to apply, visit http://research.nvidia.com/relevant/graduate-fellowship-program or email fellowship@nvidia.com.