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MIDAS Data Science for Music Challenge Initiative announces funded projects

By | Data, General Interest, Happenings, News, Research

From digital analysis of Bach sonatas to mining data from crowdsourced compositions, researchers at the University of Michigan are using modern big data techniques to transform how we understand, create and interact with music.

Four U-M research teams will receive support for projects that apply data science tools like machine learning and data mining to the study of music theory, performance, social media-based music making, and the connection between words and music. The funding is provided under the Data Science for Music Challenge Initiative through the Michigan Institute for Data Science (MIDAS).

“MIDAS is excited to catalyze innovative, interdisciplinary research at the intersection of data science and music,” said Alfred Hero, co-director of MIDAS and the John H. Holland Distinguished University Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science. “The four proposals selected will apply and demonstrate some of the most powerful state-of-the-art machine learning and data mining methods to empirical music theory, automated musical accompaniment of text and data-driven analysis of music performance.”

Jason Corey, associate dean for graduate studies and research at the School of Music, Theatre & Dance, added: “These new collaborations between our music faculty and engineers, mathematicians and computer scientists will help broaden and deepen our understanding of the complexities of music composition and performance.”

The four projects represent the beginning of MIDAS’ support for the emerging Data Science for Music research. The long-term goal is to build a critical mass of interdisciplinary researchers for sustained development of this research area, which demonstrates the power of data science to transform traditional research disciplines.

Each project will receive $75,000 over a year. The projects are:

Understanding and Mining Patterns of Audience Engagement and Creative Collaboration in Large-Scale Crowdsourced Music Performances

Investigators: Danai Koutra and Walter Lasecki, both assistant professors of computer science and engineering

Summary: The project will develop a platform for crowdsourced music making and performance, and use data mining techniques to discover patterns in audience engagement and participation. The results can be applied to other interactive settings as well, including developing new educational tools.

Understanding How the Brain Processes Music Through the Bach Trio Sonatas
Investigators: Daniel Forger, professor of mathematics and computational medicine and bioinformatics; James Kibbie, professor and chair of organ and university organist

Summary: The project will develop and analyze a library of digitized performances of Bach’s Trio Sonatas, applying novel algorithms to study the music structure from a data science perspective. The team’s analysis will compare different performances to determine features that make performances artistic, as well as the common mistakes performers make. Findings will be integrated into courses both on organ performance and on data science.

The Sound of Text
Investigators: Rada Mihalcea, professor of electrical engineering and computer science; Anıl Çamcı, assistant professor of performing arts technology

Summary: The project will develop a data science framework that will connect language and music, developing tools that can produce musical interpretations of texts based on content and emotion. The resulting tool will be able to translate any text—poetry, prose, or even research papers—into music.

A Computational Study of Patterned Melodic Structures Across Musical Cultures
Investigators: Somangshu Mukherji, assistant professor of music theory; Xuanlong Nguyen, associate professor of statistics

Summary: This project will combine music theory and computational analysis to compare the melodies of music across six cultures—including Indian and Irish songs, as well as Bach and Mozart—to identify commonalities in how music is structured cross-culturally.

The Data Science for Music program is the fifth challenge initiative funded by MIDAS to promote innovation in data science and cross-disciplinary collaboration, while building on existing expertise of U-M researchers. The other four are focused on transportation, health sciences, social sciences and learning analytics.

Hero said the confluence of music and data science was a natural extension.

“The University of Michigan’s combined strengths in data science methodology and music makes us an ideal crucible for discovery and innovation at this intersection,” he said.

Contact: Dan Meisler, Communications Manager, Advanced Research Computing
734-764-7414, dmeisler@umich.edu

ARC-TS begins work on new “Great Lakes” cluster to replace Flux

By | Flux, Happenings, HPC, News

Advanced Research Computing – Technology Services (ARC-TS) is starting the process of creating a new, campus-wide computing cluster, “Great Lakes,” that will serve the broad needs of researchers across the University. Over time, Great Lakes will replace Flux, the shared research computing cluster that currently serves over 300 research projects and 2,500 active users.

“Researchers will see improved performance, flexibility and reliability associated with newly purchased hardware, as well as changes in policies that will result in greater efficiencies and ease of use,” said Brock Palen, director of ARC-TS.

The Great Lakes cluster will be available to all researchers on campus for simulation, modeling, machine learning, data science, genomics, and more. The platform will provide a balanced combination of computing power, I/O performance, storage capability, and accelerators.

ARC-TS is in the process of procuring the cluster. Only minimal interruption to ongoing research is expected. A “Beta” cluster will be available to help researchers learn the new system before Great Lakes is deployed in the first half of 2019.

The Flux cluster is approximately 8 years old, although many of the individual nodes are newer. One of the benefits of replacing the cluster is to create a more homogeneous platform.

Based on extensive input from faculty and other stakeholders across campus, the new Great Lakes cluster will be designed to deliver similar services and capabilities as Flux, including the ability to accommodate faculty purchases of hardware, access to GPUs and large-memory nodes, and improved support for emerging uses such as machine learning and genomics. The cluster will consist of approximately 20,000 cores.

For more information, contact hpc-support@umich.edu, and see arc-ts.umich.edu/systems-services/greatlakes, where updates to the project will be posted.

Eric Parish, Aero Ph.D student, wins Von Neumann Fellowship from Sandia National Labs

By | Happenings, News, Research

Eric Parish

Eric Parish, who will graduate this spring with a Ph.D in Aerospace Engineering, is the 2018 recipient of the prestigious John von Neumann Postdoctoral Research Fellowship from Sandia National Laboratories (SNL). The highly competitive fellowship offers the opportunity to establish his own program at SNL to conduct innovative research in computational mathematics and scientific computing on advanced computing architectures.

Parish came to U-M from the University of Wyoming, and has developed innovative methodologies of computational math and physics with Prof. Karthik Duraisamy.

Parish said two of his accomplishments in his doctoral work have been developing data-driven solutions to computational physics problems using the NSF-funded ConFlux computing cluster, and bringing together ideas from statistical mechanics to develop efficient numerical solutions of complex partial differential equations.

“It was bridging a gap between communities,” he said of the latter effort.

“Eric came up with a particularly clever way of generalizing concepts from physics to develop a foundation to solve complex equations at a low cost in a mathematically rigorous fashion,” Duraisamy said. “He is one of the rare students who commands an exceptional grasp of applied mathematics, computing and physics, while being well-rounded in his organizational and communication skills. It has been a pleasure and a privilege to work with him.”

Parish said this research could eventually help usher the next generation of flight, for example, “hypersonic” aircraft that can travel at speeds of Mach 8-10. To help get there, his work moves the field toward a better understanding of the underlying physical phenomena via accurate numerical simulations.

At Sandia’s labs in Livermore, Calif., Parish said he plans to continue the work he started at U-M to develop “reduced order models”, which can process past simulation data to greatly reduce the computational cost of future simulations.

Parish said that conducting research at U-M, with the availability of high performance computing resources and a community of computational scientists to bounce ideas off of, helped push his research to a higher level.

“Within Aero, there are five or six very strong computational groups, which really helps me understand the fundamental aspects of what we’re doing, and what the addition of my small little delta means,” he said. “It’s very exciting to do computational research in that environment; it motivates me to come up with better code.”

In 2016, Parish received a $4,000 fellowship from the Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering (MICDE). He used some of the funds to attend the International Workshop on Variational Multiscale Methods in Spain last year, where he met a few dozen people from around the world working on similar problems.

“It was fantastic to network and learn from them,” he said.

Parish grew up in Laramie, Wyo., before attending the University of Wyoming, where he played Division 1 golf. He said there was a small but active computational science community at U-W.

“For its size, there was a lot of good computational stuff there,” he said, adding that 10 years ago he would never have predicted the current direction of his career.

Golf played a significant role in his development as well, Parish said: “Being a successful student-athlete takes an extraordinary amount of work. The successes and failures I had … played an integral part in the development of my work ethic, time management skills, mental attitude, and overall growth as a person…I believe that the experience I gained as a student-athlete gave me a unique perspective and skill set that I was able to use to my advantage.”

As far as his future goes after Sandia, Parish said he plans to either continue in the national lab environment or to explore faculty positions so that he can teach and motivate students as his professors at Wyoming and Michigan did for him.

“I’m grateful for everyone’s help,” he said. “The doors that Michigan can open and the quality of people here are very apparent.”

A simulation of magnetohydrodynamic turbulence done on the ConFlux cluster with roughly 1 billion degree of freedom computation generating about 4TB of data.

Winning posters announced for MICDE 2018 Symposium

By | Events, General Interest, Happenings, News

Approximately 50 posters from post-docs and graduate students across campus entered the Poster Competition at the 2018 MICDE Symposium on March 22, 2018. We’re proud to announce the winners:

  • First Place ($500): “Modeling and Enhanced Sampling of Protein-Protein Recognition,” Yanmin Wang, Chemistry
  • Second Place ($300): “Non-Newtonian Computational Model of Thrombosis Initiation,” Sabrina Lynch, Biomedical Engineering
  • Third Place ($200): “Computational Modeling of Particle-Laden Flows,” Gregory Shallcross, Sarah Beetham, and Yuan Yao, Mechanical Engineering
  • Honorable Mention:UM/LISA: Efficient Linear and Nonlinear Guided Wave Simulation,” Hui Zhang, Aerospace Engineering
  • Honorable Mention:Temperature-Dependent Green’s Function Methods for Electronic Structure Calculations,” Alicia Welden, Chemistry
  • Honorable Mention:Non-invasive Diagnostics of Coronary Artery Disease using Machine Learning and Computational Fluid Dynamics,” Kritika Iyer, Biomedical Engineering
  • Honorable Mention:Automated Diagnosis and Prognosis System for Traumatic Brain Injury Patients with Subdural Hematoma,” Negar Farzaneh

Interdisciplinary Committee on Organizational Studies (ICOS) Big Data Summer Camp, May 14-18

By | Data, Educational, General Interest, Happenings, News
Social and organizational life are increasingly conducted online through electronic media, from emails to Twitter feed to dating sites to GPS phone tracking. The traces these activities leave behind have acquired the (misleading) title of “big data.” Within a few years, a standard part of graduate training in the social sciences will include a hefty dose of “using of big data,” and we will all be utilizing terms like API and Python.
This year ICOS, MIDAS, and ARC are again offering a one-week “big data summer camp” for doctoral students interested in organizational research, with a combination of detailed examples from researchers; hands-on instruction in Python, SQL, and APIs; and group work to apply these ideas to organizational questions.  Enrollment is free, but students must commit to attending all day for each day of camp, and be willing to work in interdisciplinary groups.

The dates of the camp are all day May 14th-18th.

https://ttc.iss.lsa.umich.edu/ttc/sessions/interdisciplinary-committee-on-organizational-studies-icos-big-data-summer-camp-3/ 

ITS offers training in AWS, Azure, and Google Cloud Platform

By | Educational, Events, General Interest, Happenings, News

Information and Technology Services (ITS) is pleased to announce training for Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud Platform. These day-long sessions will provide an overview as well as hands-on opportunities to explore these cloud based computing platforms. You will be able to get help with your specific use case, leveraging these platforms. Learn and apply knowledge to the work/research you are doing right now!

All scheduled dates will be held at the Campus Safety Services Building, 1239 Kipke Dr., Ann Arbor, MI with the exception of the May 9 Google Cloud Platform class, which will be held at Pierpont Commons, East Room. Registration required; seats are limited. Click on the class of your choice below to register (UMICH login required):

The training will range from beginner to more advanced throughout the day. If you have attended one of our past trainings for AWS, Azure, or GCP, we would like your input as we  work to finalize the agenda. Detailed agendas will be provided once finalized. To get started with these cloud services, or to get more information visit the service home page.

ITS offers AWS at U-M, Azure at U-M, and GCP at U-M to enable the U-M community to more easily consume public cloud computing services by working with these vendors to secure better terms and pricing only available to the University of Michigan. The ITS service also provides integration to campus resources and security, as well as consulting and training.

For Assistance or Questions

If you have questions about your service, please email ccs.support@umich.edu.

ConFlux cluster expands

By | General Interest, Happenings, HPC, News

ARC-TS has installed 15 new compute nodes into the ConFlux cluster. These nodes have the same 20 cores CPU as the original set, but with 256 GB of RAM instead of 128 GB. Neither the original nodes nor the newly added ones contain any GPUs

As a result, jobs should spend less time in queue, and users can be more liberal in their memory requirements.

U-M launches Data Science Master’s Program

By | Educational, General Interest, Happenings, News

The University of Michigan’s new, interdisciplinary Data Science Master’s Program is taking applications for its first group of students. The program is aimed at teaching participants how to extract useful knowledge from massive datasets using computational and statistical techniques.

The program is a collaboration between the College of Engineering (EECS), the College of Literature Science and the Arts (Statistics), the School of Public Health (Biostatistics), the School of Information, and the Michigan Institute for Data Science.

“We are very excited to be offering this unique collaborative program, which brings together expertise from four key disciplines at the University in a curriculum that is at the forefront of data science,” said HV Jagadish, Bernard A. Galler Collegiate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, who chairs the program committee for the program.

“MIDAS was a catalyst in bringing  faculty from multiple disciplines together to work towards the development of this new degree program,”  he added.

MIDAS will provide students in this program with interdisciplinary collaborations, intellectual stimulation, exposure to a broad range of practice, networking opportunities, and space on Central Campus to meet for formal and informal gatherings.

For more information, see the program website at https://lsa.umich.edu/stats/masters_students/mastersprograms/data-science-masters-program.html, and the program guide (PDF) at https://lsa.umich.edu/content/dam/stats-assets/StatsPDF/MSDS-Program-Guide.pdf.

Applications are due March 15.

HPC training workshops begin Tuesday, Feb. 13

By | Educational, Events, General Interest, Happenings, HPC, News

series of training workshops in high performance computing will be held Feb. 12 through March 6, 2018, presented by CSCAR in conjunction with Advanced Research Computing – Technology Services (ARC-TS).

Introduction to the Linux command Line
This course will familiarize the student with the basics of accessing and interacting with Linux computers using the GNU/Linux operating system’s Bash shell, also known as the “command line.”
Location: East Hall, Room B254, 530 Church St.
Dates: (Please sign up for only one)
• Tuesday, Feb. 13, 1 – 4 p.m. (full descriptionregistration)
• Friday, Feb. 16, 9 a.m. – noon (full description | registration)

Introduction to the Flux cluster and batch computing
This workshop will provide a brief overview of the components of the Flux cluster, including the resource manager and scheduler, and will offer students hands-on experience.
Location: East Hall, Room B254, 530 Church St.
Dates: (Please sign up for only one)
• Monday, Feb. 19, 1 – 4 p.m. (full description | registration)
• Tuesday, March 6, 1 – 4 p.m. (full description | registration)

Advanced batch computing on the Flux cluster
This course will cover advanced areas of cluster computing on the Flux cluster, including common parallel programming models, dependent and array scheduling, and a brief introduction to scientific computing with Python, among other topics.
Location: East Hall, Room B250, 530 Church St.
Dates: (Please sign up for only one)
• Wednesday, Feb. 21, 1 – 5 p.m. (full description | registration)
• Friday, Feb. 23, 1 – 5 p.m. (full description | registration)

Hadoop and Spark workshop
Learn how to process large amounts (up to terabytes) of data using SQL and/or simple programming models available in Python, R, Scala, and Java.
Location: East Hall, Room B250, 530 Church St.
Dates: (Please sign up for only one)
• Thursday, Feb. 22, 1 – 5 p.m. (full description | registration)