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U-M approves new graduate certificate in computational neuroscience

By | Educational, General Interest, Happenings, News

The new Graduate Certificate in Computational Neuroscience will help bridge the gap between experimentally focused studies and quantitative modeling and analysis, giving graduate students a chance to broaden their skill sets in the diversifying field of brain science.

“The broad, practical training provided in this certificate program will help prepare both quantitatively focused and lab-based students for the increasingly cross-disciplinary job market in neuroscience,” said Victoria Booth, Professor of Mathematics and Associate Professor of Anesthesiology, who will oversee the program.

To earn the certificate, students will be required to take core computational neuroscience courses and cross-disciplinary courses outside of their home departments; participate in a specialized interdisciplinary journal club; and complete a practicum.

Cross-discplinary courses will depend on a student’s focus: students in experimental neuroscience programs will take quantitative coursework, and students in quantitative science programs such as physics, biophysics, mathematics and engineering will take neuroscience coursework.

The certificate was approved this fall, and will be jointly administered by the Neuroscience Graduate Program (NGP) and the Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering (MICDE).

For more information, visit micde.umich.edu/comput-neuro-certificate. Enrollment is not yet open, but information sessions will be scheduled early next year. Please register for the program’s mailing list if you’re interested.

Along with the Graduate Certificate in Computational Neuroscience, U-M offers several other graduate programs aimed at training students in computational and data-intensive science, including:

  • The Graduate Certificate in Computational Discovery and Engineering, which is focused on quantitative and computing techniques that can be applied broadly to all sciences.
  • The Graduate Certificate in Data Science, which specializes in statistical and computational methods required to analyze large data sets.
  • The Ph.D in Scientific Computing, intended for students who will make extensive use of large-scale computation, computational methods, or algorithms for advanced computer architectures in their doctoral studies. This degree is awarded jointly with an existing program, so that a student receives, for example, a Ph.D in Aerospace engineering and Scientific Computing.

 

U-M awarded a Clare Boothe Luce grant for fellowships to support women in STEM

By | Educational, General Interest, Happenings, News

The Clare Boothe Luce Program of the Henry Luce Foundation has awarded a $270,000 grant to the University of Michigan. The funding will support women PhD students through the Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering (MICDE). The program aims to encourage women “to enter, study, graduate and teach” in science, and the funding will support women PhD students who make use of computational science in their research.

“We’re very excited to be able to promote women in scientific computing,” said Mariana Carrasco-Teja, manager of the grant and Associate Director of MICDE. “These resources generously provided by the Clare Boothe Luce program will make a huge difference in the careers of women pursuing computational science at U-M.”

For details on applying, and fellowship requirements, see the fellowship page at micde.umich.edu/academic-programs/cbl/.

The fellowships carry a $35,000 annual stipend and tuition, among other benefits. They will be awarded to students applying for PhD programs in fall 2019 in the College of Engineering, or several programs in the College of Literature, Science and the Arts (Applied and Interdisciplinary Mathematics, Applied Physics, Astronomy, Chemistry, Earth & Environmental Sciences, Mathematics, Physics, and Statistics).

The CBL program at U-M is funded by the Clare Boothe Luce Program of the Henry Luce Foundation, with additional support from the Rackham School of Graduate Studies, the College of Engineering, the College of Literature, Sciences and the Arts, and MICDE.

MIDAS announces winners of 2018 poster competition

By | Educational, General Interest, Happenings, Research

The Michigan Institute for Data Science (MIDAS) is pleased to announce the winners of its 2018 poster competition, which is held in conjunction with the MIDAS annual symposium.

The symposium was held on Oct. 9-10, 2018, and the student poster competition had more than 60 entries. The winners, judged by a panel of faculty members, received cash prizes.

Best Overall

Arthur Endsley, “Comparing and timing business cycles and land development trends in U.S. metropolitan housing markets”

Most likely health impact

  • Yehu Chen, Yingsi Jian, Qiucheng Wu, Yichen Yang, “Compressive Big Data Analytics – CBDA: Applications to Biomedical and Health Studies”
  • Jinghui Liu, “An Information Retrieval System with an Iterative Pattern for TREC Precision Medicine”

Most likely transformative science impact

  • Prashant Rajaram, “Bingeability and Ad Tolerance: New Metrics for the Streaming Media Age”
  • Mike Ion, “Learning About the Norms of Teaching Practice: How Can Machine Learning Help Analyze Teachers’ Reactions to Scenarios?”

Most interesting methodological advancement

  • Nina Zhou and Qiucheng Wu, “DataSifter: Statistical Obfuscation of Electronic Health Records and Other Sensitive Datasets”
  • Aniket Deshmukh, “Simple Regret Minimization for Contextual Bandits”

Most likely societal impact

  • Ece Sanci, “Optimization of Food Pantry Locations to Address Food Scarcity in Toledo, OH”
  • Rohail Syed, “Human Perception of Surprise: A User Study”

Most innovative use of data

  • Lan Luo, “Renewable Estimation and Incremental Inference in Generalized Linear Models with Streaming Datasets”
  • Danaja  Maldeniya, “Psychological Response of Communities affected by Natural Disasters in Social Media”

MICDE announces 2018-2019 fellowship recipients

By | Educational, General Interest, Happenings, News

The Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering (MICDE) is pleased to announce the 2018-2019 recipients of the MICDE Fellowships for students enrolled in the PhD in Scientific Computing or the Graduate Certificate in Computational Discovery and Engineering. The fellowships, which carry a $4,000 stipend, are meant to augment other sources of funding and are available to students in both programs. See our Fellowship page for more information.

AWARDEES

Zhitong Bai, Mechanical Engineering
Kyle Bushick, Materials Science and Engineering
Geunyeong Byeon, Industrial and Operations Engineering
Sehwan Chung, Civil and Environmental Engineering
Khoi Dang, Chemistry
Sicen Du, Materials Science and Engineering
Joseph Hollowed, Physics
Jia Li, Physics
Sabrina Lynch, Biomedical Engineering
Samar Minallah, Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering
Everardo Olide, Applied Physics
Shaowu Pan, Aerospace Engineering
Alicia Petersen, Climate and Space Sciences and Engineering
Vyas Ramasubramani, Chemical Engineering
Fabricio Vasselai, Political Science
Nathan Vaughn, Applied and Interdisciplinary Mathematics
Blair Winograd, Chemistry
Samuel Young, Chemical Engineering
Kexin Zhang, Chemistry
Bu Zhao, School of Environment and Sustainability

New course for fall 2018: On-Ramp to Data Science for Chemical Engineers

By | Educational, General Interest, Happenings, News

Description: Engineers are encountering and generating a ever-growing body of data and recognizing the utility of applying data science (DataSci) approaches to extract knowledge from that data. A common barrier to learning DataSci is the stack of prerequisite courses that cannot fit into the typical engineering student schedule. This class will remove this barrier by, in one semester, covering essential foundational concepts that are not part of many engineering disciplines’ core curricula. These include: good programming practices, data structures, linear algebra, numerical methods, algorithms, probability, and statistics. The class’s focus will be on how these topics relate to data science and to provide context for further self-study.

Eligibility: College of Engineering students, pending instructor approval.

More information: http://myumi.ch/LzqPq

Instructor: Heather Mayes, Assistant Professor, Chemical Engineering, hbmayes@umich.edu.

Interdisciplinary Committee on Organizational Studies (ICOS) Big Data Summer Camp, May 14-18

By | Data, Educational, General Interest, Happenings, News
Social and organizational life are increasingly conducted online through electronic media, from emails to Twitter feed to dating sites to GPS phone tracking. The traces these activities leave behind have acquired the (misleading) title of “big data.” Within a few years, a standard part of graduate training in the social sciences will include a hefty dose of “using of big data,” and we will all be utilizing terms like API and Python.
This year ICOS, MIDAS, and ARC are again offering a one-week “big data summer camp” for doctoral students interested in organizational research, with a combination of detailed examples from researchers; hands-on instruction in Python, SQL, and APIs; and group work to apply these ideas to organizational questions.  Enrollment is free, but students must commit to attending all day for each day of camp, and be willing to work in interdisciplinary groups.

The dates of the camp are all day May 14th-18th.

https://ttc.iss.lsa.umich.edu/ttc/sessions/interdisciplinary-committee-on-organizational-studies-icos-big-data-summer-camp-3/ 

ITS offers training in AWS, Azure, and Google Cloud Platform

By | Educational, Events, General Interest, Happenings, News

Information and Technology Services (ITS) is pleased to announce training for Amazon Web Services, Microsoft Azure, and Google Cloud Platform. These day-long sessions will provide an overview as well as hands-on opportunities to explore these cloud based computing platforms. You will be able to get help with your specific use case, leveraging these platforms. Learn and apply knowledge to the work/research you are doing right now!

All scheduled dates will be held at the Campus Safety Services Building, 1239 Kipke Dr., Ann Arbor, MI with the exception of the May 9 Google Cloud Platform class, which will be held at Pierpont Commons, East Room. Registration required; seats are limited. Click on the class of your choice below to register (UMICH login required):

The training will range from beginner to more advanced throughout the day. If you have attended one of our past trainings for AWS, Azure, or GCP, we would like your input as we  work to finalize the agenda. Detailed agendas will be provided once finalized. To get started with these cloud services, or to get more information visit the service home page.

ITS offers AWS at U-M, Azure at U-M, and GCP at U-M to enable the U-M community to more easily consume public cloud computing services by working with these vendors to secure better terms and pricing only available to the University of Michigan. The ITS service also provides integration to campus resources and security, as well as consulting and training.

For Assistance or Questions

If you have questions about your service, please email ccs.support@umich.edu.

U-M launches Data Science Master’s Program

By | Educational, General Interest, Happenings, News

The University of Michigan’s new, interdisciplinary Data Science Master’s Program is taking applications for its first group of students. The program is aimed at teaching participants how to extract useful knowledge from massive datasets using computational and statistical techniques.

The program is a collaboration between the College of Engineering (EECS), the College of Literature Science and the Arts (Statistics), the School of Public Health (Biostatistics), the School of Information, and the Michigan Institute for Data Science.

“We are very excited to be offering this unique collaborative program, which brings together expertise from four key disciplines at the University in a curriculum that is at the forefront of data science,” said HV Jagadish, Bernard A. Galler Collegiate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, who chairs the program committee for the program.

“MIDAS was a catalyst in bringing  faculty from multiple disciplines together to work towards the development of this new degree program,”  he added.

MIDAS will provide students in this program with interdisciplinary collaborations, intellectual stimulation, exposure to a broad range of practice, networking opportunities, and space on Central Campus to meet for formal and informal gatherings.

For more information, see the program website at https://lsa.umich.edu/stats/masters_students/mastersprograms/data-science-masters-program.html, and the program guide (PDF) at https://lsa.umich.edu/content/dam/stats-assets/StatsPDF/MSDS-Program-Guide.pdf.

Applications are due March 15.

HPC training workshops begin Tuesday, Feb. 13

By | Educational, Events, General Interest, Happenings, HPC, News

series of training workshops in high performance computing will be held Feb. 12 through March 6, 2018, presented by CSCAR in conjunction with Advanced Research Computing – Technology Services (ARC-TS).

Introduction to the Linux command Line
This course will familiarize the student with the basics of accessing and interacting with Linux computers using the GNU/Linux operating system’s Bash shell, also known as the “command line.”
Location: East Hall, Room B254, 530 Church St.
Dates: (Please sign up for only one)
• Tuesday, Feb. 13, 1 – 4 p.m. (full descriptionregistration)
• Friday, Feb. 16, 9 a.m. – noon (full description | registration)

Introduction to the Flux cluster and batch computing
This workshop will provide a brief overview of the components of the Flux cluster, including the resource manager and scheduler, and will offer students hands-on experience.
Location: East Hall, Room B254, 530 Church St.
Dates: (Please sign up for only one)
• Monday, Feb. 19, 1 – 4 p.m. (full description | registration)
• Tuesday, March 6, 1 – 4 p.m. (full description | registration)

Advanced batch computing on the Flux cluster
This course will cover advanced areas of cluster computing on the Flux cluster, including common parallel programming models, dependent and array scheduling, and a brief introduction to scientific computing with Python, among other topics.
Location: East Hall, Room B250, 530 Church St.
Dates: (Please sign up for only one)
• Wednesday, Feb. 21, 1 – 5 p.m. (full description | registration)
• Friday, Feb. 23, 1 – 5 p.m. (full description | registration)

Hadoop and Spark workshop
Learn how to process large amounts (up to terabytes) of data using SQL and/or simple programming models available in Python, R, Scala, and Java.
Location: East Hall, Room B250, 530 Church St.
Dates: (Please sign up for only one)
• Thursday, Feb. 22, 1 – 5 p.m. (full description | registration)