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Fuse HDFS

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Fuse HDFS allows you use standard posix system commands with HDFS. This may be useful, for example, if you have a program that needs to use data that is stored in HDFS. 

To use Fuse HDFS, change directories to /hadoop-fuse/user/<your_uniqname>

Once in this directory, you can use commands on your HDFS files just as you would on any other files. For example, the ls command will list the contents of your HDFS home directory.

You could also run a Python or R program that uses a file in HDFS.

You can save the below file and run it as you would regularly run a python program to access an example data file we have available to all users in HDFS.

#!/usr/bin/python
f = open("/hadoop-fuse/var/examples/romeojuliet.txt", "r")
data = f.read()
f.close()
d = {}
for word in data.split(' '):
        if word in d:
                d[word] += 1
        else:
                d[word] = 1
for word, count in d.items():
        print word + str(count)

Logging In

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To log in to the Cavium Hadoop cluster, you need a terminal.  Currently the cluster is only accessible via the command line.

If you are trying to log in from off campus, or using the M-Guest wireless network, you have a couple of options:

    • Install VPN software on your computer
    • First ssh to login.itd.umich.edu, then ssh to cavium-thunderx.arc-ts.umich.edu from there.

Here’s what a login looks like using a terminal emulator:

Mac using terminal: Open terminal

Type: ssh -l uniqname cavium-thunderx.arc-ts.umich.edu [replacing your uniqname in the command]

Windows using PuTTY (http://www.chiark.greenend.org.uk/~sgtatham/putty/).

Launch Putty and enter cavium-thunderx.arc-ts.umich.edu as the host name then click open.

For both Mac and Windows:

At the “Enter a passcode or select one of the following options:” prompt, type the number of your preferred choice for Duo authentication.

Hive

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Hive is currently not available on the Cavium ThunderX Cluster. Check back soon for updates.

Streaming (Other Programming Methods)

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It is also possible to write a job in any programming language, such as Python or C, that operates on tab-separated key-value pairs. The same example done above with Hive and Pig can also be written in Python and submitted as a Hadoop job using Hadoop Streaming. Submitting a job with Hadoop Streaming requires writing a mapper and a reducer. The mapper reads input line by line and generates key-value pairs for the reducer to “reduce” into some sort of sensible data. For our case, the mapper will read in lines and output the year as the key and a ‘1’ as the value if the ngram in the line it reads has only appeared in a single volume. The python code to do this is:

(Save this file as map.py)

#!/usr/bin/env python2.7
import fileinput
for line in fileinput.input():
 arr = line.split("\t")
 try:
    if int(arr[3]) == 1:
       print("\t".join([arr[1], '1']))
 except IndexError:
       pass
 except ValueError:
       pass

 

Now that the mapper has done this, the reduce merely needs to sum the values based on the key:

(Save this file as red.py)

#!/usr/bin/env python2.7

import fileinput

data = dict()

for line in fileinput.input():
  arr = line.split("\t")
  if arr[0] not in data.keys():
     data[arr[0]] = int(arr[1])
  else:
     data[arr[0]] = data[arr[0]] + int(arr[1])

for key in data:
 print("\t".join([key, str(data[key])]))

 

Submitting this streaming job can be done by running the below command:

yarn jar $HADOOP_STREAMING \
 -Dmapreduce.job.queuename=<your_queue> \
 -input /var/ngrams/data \
 -output ngrams-out \
 -mapper map.py \
 -reducer red.py \
 -file map.py \
 -file red.py \
 -numReduceTasks 10


hdfs dfs -cat ngrams-out/* | tail -5

streaming output
hdfs dfs -rm -r -skipTrash /user/<your_uniqname>/ngrams-out

Pig

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Pig is similar to Hive and can do the same thing. The Pig code to do this is a little bit longer due to its design. However, writing long Pig code is generally easier that writing multiple SQL queries that that chain together, since Pig’s language, PigLatin, allows for variables and other high-level constructs.

# Open the interactive pig console
pig -Dtez.job.queuename=<your_queue>

# Load the data
ngrams = LOAD '/var/ngrams' USING PigStorage('\t') AS 
(ngram:chararray,
year:int, count:long, volumes:long);

# Look at the schema of the ngrams variable
describe ngrams;

# Count the total number of rows (should be 1430731493)
ngrp = GROUP ngrams ALL;
count = FOREACH ngrp GENERATE COUNT(ngrams);
DUMP count;

# Select the number of words, by year, that have only appeared in a single volume
one_volume = FILTER ngrams BY volumes == 1;
by_year = GROUP one_volume BY year;
yearly_count = FOREACH by_year GENERATE group, COUNT(one_volume);
DUMP yearly_count;

The last few lines of output should look like this:

More information on Pig can be found on the Apache website.

mrjob

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Another way to run Hadoop jobs is through mrjob. Mrjob is useful for testing out smaller data on another system (such as your laptop), and later being able to run it on something larger, like a Hadoop cluster. To run an mrjob on your laptop, you can simply remove the “-r hadoop” from the command in the example we use here.

A classic example is a word count, taken from the official mrjob documentation here.

Save this file as mrjob_test.py.

"""The classic MapReduce job: count the frequency of words.
"""
from mrjob.job import MRJob
import re

WORD_RE = re.compile(r"[\w']+")


class MRWordFreqCount(MRJob):

    def mapper(self, _, line):
        for word in WORD_RE.findall(line):
            yield (word.lower(), 1)

    def combiner(self, word, counts):
        yield (word, sum(counts))

    def reducer(self, word, counts):
        yield (word, sum(counts))


if __name__ == '__main__':
     MRWordFreqCount.run()

Then, run the following command:

python mrjob_test.py -r hadoop /etc/motd

You should receive an output with the word count of the file /etc/motd. You can also try this with any other file you have that contains text.

Spark Shell

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Spark has an easy-to-use interactive shell that can be used to learn API and also analyze data interactively. Below is a simple example written in Scala. You can use any text file that you have:

spark-shell --master yarn --queue <your_queue>
scala> val textFile = spark.read.textFile("test.txt")
scala> textFile.count()
scala> textFile.first()
//Count how many lines contain the word "words"
//You can replace "words" with any word you'd like
scala> textFile.filter(line => line.contains("words")).count()

Spark Submit

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The following is a simple example of submitting a Spark job that uses an existing jar all users have access to. It estimates Pi, and the number at the end is the number of iterations it uses (more iterations = more accurate).

export SPARK_MAJOR_VERSION=2
cd /usr/hdp/current/spark2-client
spark-submit \
   --class org.apache.spark.examples.SparkPi \
   --master yarn \
   --queue <your_queue> \
examples/jars/spark-examples*.jar 10

Gradle is a popular build tool for Java and Scala. The following example is useful if you may be getting code from bitbucket, github, etc. This code can be downloaded and built by logging on to cavium-thunderx-arc-ts.umich.edu and running:

git clone https://bitbucket.org/umarcts/spark-examples
cd spark-examples
./gradlew jar

The last command, “./gradlew jar”, will download all dependencies, compile the code, run tests, and package all of the code into a Java ARchive (JAR). This JAR is submitted to the cluster to run a job. For example, the AverageNGramLength job can be launched by running:

spark-submit \
   --class com.alectenharmsel.examples.spark.AverageNGramLength \
   --master yarn \
   --executor-memory 3g \
   --num-executors 35 \
 build/libs/spark-examples-*-all.jar /var/ngrams/data ngrams-out

The output will be located in your home directory in a directory called ‘ngrams-out’, and can be viewed by running:

hdfs dfs -cat ngrams-out/* | tail -5

The output should look like this:

spark output

SparkR

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SparkR allows users to utilize the ease of data analysis in R while using the speed and capacity of Spark on our Hadoop cluster. Those familiar with R should have no problem utilizing this feature. After opening the SparkR session, simply begin typing out your program in R.

Run this to open a SparkR session, run this:

sparkR --master yarn --queue <your_queue> --num-executors 4 --executor-memory 1g --executor-cores 4

 

The following is an example you can run to get a feel for how SparkR works. This example was taken from the official SparkR documentation, which can be found here, along with other examples.

families <- c("gaussian", "poisson")
train <- function(family) {
 model <- glm(Sepal.Length ~ Sepal.Width + Species, iris, family = family)
 summary(model)
}
# Return a list of model's summaries
model.summaries <- spark.lapply(families, train)

# Print the summary of each model
print(model.summaries)