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Computation: A Pillar of Science and a Lens to the Future — the 2018 MICDE Symposium

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The Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering 2018 Symposium will feature eminent scientists from around the world and the U-M campus. The symposium this year will show how computational science is leading the research at all scales in our lives, from the molecular level to the sky.

Visit the Symposium page for more details.

Please register if you plan to attend.

SPEAKERS


Guruduth Banavar
Chief Technology Officer
Viome


Cynthia Chestek
Assistant Professor, Biomedical Engineering and EECS
University of Michigan


Alison Marsden
Principal Investigator, Cardiovascular Biomechanics Computation Lab
Stanford University


Cleve Moler
Cofounder and Chief Mathematician
MathWorks


Raju Namburu
Chief, Computational and Information Sciences Directorate
Army Research Lab


Stephen Smith
Assistant Professor, Ecology and Evolutionary Biology
University of Michigan


Beth Wingate
Professor, Mathematics
University of Exeter

POSTER COMPETITION

The symposium will include a poster competition highlighting outstanding computational work from U-M students and postdocs. First place is awarded $500, and second and third places win $250.

Info sessions on graduate studies in computational and data sciences — Sept. 21 and 25

By | Educational, Events, General Interest, News, Research

Learn about graduate programs that will prepare you for success in computationally intensive fields — pizza and pop provided

  • The Ph.D. in Scientific Computing is open to all Ph.D. students who will make extensive use of large-scale computation, computational methods, or algorithms for advanced computer architectures in their studies. It is a joint degree program, with students earning a Ph.D. from their current departments, “… and Scientific Computing” — for example, “Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering and Scientific Computing.”
  • The Graduate Certificate in Computational Discovery and Engineering trains graduate students in computationally intensive research so they can excel in interdisciplinary HPC-focused research and product development environments. The certificate is open to all students currently pursuing Master’s or Ph.D. degrees at the University of Michigan.
  • The Graduate Certificate in Data Science is focused on developing core proficiencies in data analytics:
    1) Modeling — Understanding of core data science principles, assumptions and applications;
    2) Technology — Knowledge of basic protocols for data management, processing, computation, information extraction, and visualization;
    3) Practice — Hands-on experience with real data, modeling tools, and technology resources.

Times / Locations:

2017 MICDE Annual Symposium

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Please join us for the Michigan Institute for Computational Discovery and Engineering 2017 Symposium. The event features eminent scientists from around the world and the U-M campus. The symposium this year focuses on the “New Era of Data-Enabled Computational Science.”

Speakers:

  • Frederica Darema — Director, Air Force Office of Scientific Research
  • George Karniadakis —  Professor of Applied Mathematics, Brown University
  • Tinsley Oden Director of the Institute for Computational Engineering and Sciences, V.P. for Research, University of Texas at Austin
  • Karen Willcox — Professor of Aerospace and Aeronautics, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, co-Director of MIT Center for Computational Engineering
  • Jacqueline H. Chen — Distinguished Member of Technical Staff at the Combustion Research Facility, Sandia National Laboratories
  • Laura Balzano — Assistant Professor, Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, U-M
  • Emanuel Gull — Assistant Professor, Physics

The symposium features a poster competition and more. For more information and to register go to http://micde.umich.edu/symposium17/

Past Symposia

2016 MICDE Annual Symposium

Research Computing Symposium Fall 2014 

 

Designing optimal shunts for newborns with heart defects using computational modeling

By | General Interest, Happenings, News, Research

shuntFor babies born with hypoplastic left heart syndrome, several open-heart surgeries are required. During Stage I, a Norwood procedure is performed to construct an appropriate circulation to both the systemic and the pulmonary arteries. The pulmonary arteries receive flow from the systemic circulation, often by using a Blalock-Taussig (BT) shunt between the innominate artery and the right pulmonary artery. This procedure causes significantly disturbed flow in the pulmonary arteries.

A group of researchers led by U-M Drs. Ronald Grifka and Alberto Figueroa used computational hemodynamic simulations to demonstrate its capacity for examining the properties of the flow through and near the BT shunt. Initially, the researchers constructed a computational model which produces blood flow and pressure measurements matching the clinical magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and catheterization data. Achieving this required us to determine the level of BT shunt occlusion; because the occlusion is below the MRI resolution, this information is difficult to recover without the aid of computational simulations. The researchers determined that the shunt had undergone an effective diameter reduction of 22% since the time of surgery. Using the resulting geometric model, they showed that we can computationally reproduce the clinical data. The researchers then replaced the BT shunt by with a hypothetical alternative shunt design with a flare at the distal end. Investigation of the impact of the shunt design revealed that the flare can increase pulmonary pressure by as much as 7%, and flow by as much as 9% in the main pulmonary branches, which may be beneficial to the pulmonary circulation.

Read more in Frontiers in Pediatrics.

HPC User Meetup

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Users of high performance computing resources are invited to meet ARC-TS HPC operators and support staff in person.

There is not a set agenda; come at anytime and stay as long as you please. You can come and talk about your use of any sort of computational resource, Flux, Armis, Hadoop, XSEDE, Amazon, or other.

Ask any questions you may have. The ARC-TS staff will work with you on your specific projects, or just show you new things that can help you optimize your research.

This is also a good time to meet other researchers doing similar work.

This is open to anyone interested; it is not limited to Flux users.

Examples of potential topics:

  • What ARC-TS services are there, and how to access them?
  • I want to do X, do you have software capable of it?
  • What is special about GPU/Xeon Phi/Accelerators?
  • Are there resources for people without budgets?
  • I want to apply for grant X, but it has certain limitations. What support can ARC-TS provide?
  • I want to learn more about the compiler and debugging?
  • I want to learn more about performance tuning, can you look at my code with me?
  • Etc.

MICDE Seminar: Ann Almgren, Lawrence Berkeley National Lab

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AnnAlmgrenBio: Ann S. Almgren is an applied mathematician who works as a staff scientist and acting group leader of the Center for Computational Sciences and Engineering at the Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory. Her research interests involve the computational simulation of problems in astrophysics including the behavior of supernovae and white dwarfs. She earned a bachelor’s degree in physics from Harvard University in 1984 and master’s and doctoral degrees in mechanical engineering from the University of California, Berkeley in 1987 and 1991 respectively. After visiting the Institute for Advanced Study, she joined the applied mathematics group of the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory in 1992, and moved to the Lawrence Berkeley Lab in 1996.

In 2015 she became a fellow of the Society for Industrial and Applied Mathematics “for contributions to the development of numerical methods for fluid dynamics and applying them to large-scale scientific and engineering problems.”[1]

 

[1] Biographical information taken from https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ann_S._Almgren

MICDE Seminar Series: David Higon, Virginia Tech

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Dave Higdon.  2014.11.20.  Personnel Photo.

Bio: David M. Higdon is a professor in the Social Decision Analytics Laboratory at the Biocomplexity Institute of Virginia Tech. Previously, he spent 10 years as a scientist or group leader of the Statistical Sciences Group at Los Alamos National Laboratory. He is an expert in Bayesian statistical modeling of environmental and physical systems, combining physical observations with computer simulation models for prediction and inference. His research interests include space-time modeling; inverse problems in hydrology and imaging; statistical modeling in ecology, environmental science, and biology; multiscale models; parallel processing in posterior exploration; statistical computing; and Monte Carlo and simulation based methods. Dr. Higdon has served on several advisory groups concerned with statistical modeling and uncertainty quantification and co-chaired the NRC Committee on Mathematical Foundations of Validation, Verification, and Uncertainty Quantification. He is a fellow of the American Statistical Association. Dr. Higdon holds a B.A. and M.A. in mathematics from the University of California, San Diego, and a Ph.D. in statistics from the University of Washington.[1]

This seminar is co-sponsored by U-M Industrial Operations & Engineering department

[1] Biographical information taken from https://www.bi.vt.edu/faculty/Dave-Higdon

HPC User Meetup

By |

Users of high performance computing resources are invited to meet ARC-TS HPC operators and support staff in person.

There is not a set agenda; come at anytime and stay as long as you please. You can come and talk about your use of any sort of computational resource, Flux, Armis, Hadoop, XSEDE, Amazon, or other.

Ask any questions you may have. The ARC-TS staff will work with you on your specific projects, or just show you new things that can help you optimize your research.

This is also a good time to meet other researchers doing similar work.

This is open to anyone interested; it is not limited to Flux users.

Examples of potential topics:

  • What ARC-TS services are there, and how to access them?
  • I want to do X, do you have software capable of it?
  • What is special about GPU/Xeon Phi/Accelerators?
  • Are there resources for people without budgets?
  • I want to apply for grant X, but it has certain limitations. What support can ARC-TS provide?
  • I want to learn more about the compiler and debugging?
  • I want to learn more about performance tuning, can you look at my code with me?
  • Etc.

MICDE Seminar: Andrea Lodi, Ecole Polytechnique, Montreal

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AndreaLodiBio: Dr. Andrea Lodi is a professor in the department of Mathematical and Industrial Engineering at the Polytechnique Montreal. He is the Canada Excellence Research Chair in Data Science for Real-Time Decision-Making at Polytechnique Montréal, Canada’s main chair in operations research.

Before joining the Polytechnique, Lodi was a professor in operations research in the faculty of electrical and information engineering at Italy’s University of Bologna. He earned his doctorate in systems engineering from this same university in 2000.

Lodi is interested in developing new models and algorithms that would make it possible to process a large quantity of data from multiple sources both rapidly and effectively. Through his research, he is looking for solutions designed to improve the electricity market, rail transport logistics, and health-care planning.

Lodi’s innovative work has earned him several awards, including the Google Faculty Research Award in 2010 and the IBM Faculty Award in 2011. In 2005 and 2006, he was a fellow in the prestigious Herman Goldstine program at the IBM Thomas J. Watson Research Center in New York.

In addition to co-ordinating several large-scale European projects in operations research, Lodi has also acted as a consultant for the IBM CPLEX research and development team since 2006. He has authored more than 70 publications in top mathematical programming journals; and has served as associate editor for several of these journals.[1]

 

This seminar is co-sponsored by the U-M Department of Industrial Operations & Engineering

 

[1] Biographical information taken from http://www.cerc.gc.ca/chairholders-titulaires/lodi-eng.aspx