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Understanding How the Brain Processes Music Through the Bach Trio Sonatas

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This event is open to the public.

Daniel Forger, Professor of Mathematics and Computational Medicine and Bioinformatics
James Kibbie, Professor of Music and Chair of the Organ Department, University Organist
Caleb Mayer, Graduate Student Research Assistant (Mathematics)
Sarah Simko, Graduate Student Research Assistant (Organ Performance)

With support from the Data Science for Music Challenge Initiative through MIDAS, the team is taking a big data approach to understanding the patterns and principles of music. The project is developing and analyzing a library of digitized performances of the Trio Sonatas for organ by Johann Sebastian Bach, applying novel algorithms to study the music structure from a data science perspective. Organ students from the School of Music, Theatre & Dance will demonstrate how the Frieze Memorial Organ in Hill Auditorium is used to create big data files of live performances. The team will discuss how its analysis compares different performances to determine features that make performances artistic, as well as the common mistakes performers make. The digitized performances will be shared with researchers and will enable research and pedagogy in many disciplines, including data science, music performance, mathematics and music psychology.

Graduate Studies in Computational & Data Sciences Info Session – Central Campus

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2016-06-14 11.13.52Learn about graduate programs that will prepare you for success in computationally intensive fields — pizza and pop provided

  • The Ph.D. in Scientific Computing is open to all Ph.D. students who will make extensive use of large-scale computation, computational methods, or algorithms for advanced computer architectures in their studies. It is a joint degree program, with students earning a Ph.D. from their current departments, “… and Scientific Computing” — for example, “Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering and Scientific Computing.”
  • The Graduate Certificate in Computational Discovery and Engineering trains graduate students in computationally intensive research so they can excel in interdisciplinary HPC-focused research and product development environments. The certificate is open to all students currently pursuing Master’s or Ph.D. degrees at the University of Michigan.
  • The Graduate Certificate in Data Science is focused on developing core proficiencies in data analytics:
    1) Modeling — Understanding of core data science principles, assumptions and applications;
    2) Technology — Knowledge of basic protocols for data management, processing, computation, information extraction, and visualization;
    3) Practice — Hands-on experience with real data, modeling tools, and technology resources.
  • The Graduate Certificate in Computational Neuroscience provides training in interdisciplinary computational neuroscience to graduate students in experimental neuroscience programs and to graduate students in quantitative science programs, such as physics, biophysics, mathematics and engineering. The curriculum includes required core computational neuroscience courses and coursework outside of the student’s home department research focus, i.e. quantitative coursework for students in experimental programs, and neuroscience coursework for students in quantitative programs.

Graduate Studies in Computational & Data Sciences Info Session – North Campus

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2016-06-14 11.13.52Learn about graduate programs that will prepare you for success in computationally intensive fields — pizza and pop provided

  • The Ph.D. in Scientific Computing is open to all Ph.D. students who will make extensive use of large-scale computation, computational methods, or algorithms for advanced computer architectures in their studies. It is a joint degree program, with students earning a Ph.D. from their current departments, “… and Scientific Computing” — for example, “Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering and Scientific Computing.”
  • The Graduate Certificate in Computational Discovery and Engineering trains graduate students in computationally intensive research so they can excel in interdisciplinary HPC-focused research and product development environments. The certificate is open to all students currently pursuing Master’s or Ph.D. degrees at the University of Michigan.
  • The Graduate Certificate in Data Science is focused on developing core proficiencies in data analytics:
    1) Modeling — Understanding of core data science principles, assumptions and applications;
    2) Technology — Knowledge of basic protocols for data management, processing, computation, information extraction, and visualization;
    3) Practice — Hands-on experience with real data, modeling tools, and technology resources.
  • The Graduate Certificate in Computational Neuroscience provides training in interdisciplinary computational neuroscience to graduate students in experimental neuroscience programs and to graduate students in quantitative science programs, such as physics, biophysics, mathematics and engineering. The curriculum includes required core computational neuroscience courses and coursework outside of the student’s home department research focus, i.e. quantitative coursework for students in experimental programs, and neuroscience coursework for students in quantitative programs.

H.V. Jagadish appointed director of MIDAS

By | General Interest, Happenings, News

H.V. Jagadish has been appointed director of the Michigan Institute for Data Science (MIDAS), effective February 15, 2019.

Jagadish, the Bernard A. Galler Collegiate Professor of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science at the University of Michigan, was one of the initiators of an earlier concept of a data science initiative on campus. With support from all academic units and the Institute for Social Research, the Office of the Provost and Office of the Vice President for Research, MIDAS was established in 2015 as part of the university-wide Data Science Initiative to promote interdisciplinary collaboration in data science and education.

“I have a longstanding passion for data science, and I understand its importance in addressing a variety of important societal issues,” Jagadish said. “As the focal point for data science research at Michigan, I am thrilled to help lead MIDAS into its next stage and further expand our data science efforts across disciplines.”

Jagadish replaces MIDAS co-directors Brian Athey and Alfred Hero, who completed their leadership appointments in December 2018.

“Professor Jagadish is a leader in the field of data science, and over the past two decades, he has exhibited national and international leadership in this area,” said S. Jack Hu, U-M vice president for research. “His leadership will help continue the advancement of data science methodologies and the application of data science in research in all disciplines.”

MIDAS has built a cohort of 26 active core faculty members and more than 200 affiliated faculty members who span all three U-M campuses. Institute funding has catalyzed several multidisciplinary research projects in health, transportation, learning analytics, social sciences and the arts, many of which have generated significant external funding. MIDAS also plays a key role in establishing new educational opportunities, such as the graduate certificate in data science, and provides additional support for student groups, including one team that used data science to help address the Flint water crisis.

As director, Jagadish aims to expand the institute’s research focus and strengthen its partnerships with industry.

“The number of academic fields taking advantage of data science techniques and tools has been growing dramatically,” Jagadish said. “Over the next several years, MIDAS will continue to leverage the university’s strengths in data science methodologies to advance research in a wide array of fields, including the humanities and social sciences.”

Jagadish joined U-M in 1999. He previously led the Database Research Department at AT&T Labs.

His research, which focuses on information management, has resulted in more than 200 journal articles and 37 patents. Jagadish is a fellow of the Association for Computing Machinery and the American Association for the Advancement of Science, and he served nine years on the Computing Research Association board.

SAVE THE DATE: MIDAS Annual Symposium, Oct. 11

By | Events, General Interest, News

Please join us for the 2017 Michigan Institute for Data Science Symposium.

The keynote speaker will be Cathy O’Neil, mathematician and best-selling author of “Weapons of Math Destruction: How Big Data Increases Inequality and Threatens Democracy.”

Other speakers include:

  • Nadya Bliss, Director of the Global Security Initiative, Arizona State University
  • Francesca Dominici, Co-Director of the Data Science Initiative and Professor of Biostatistics, Harvard T.H. Chan School of Public Health
  • Daniela Whitten, Associate Professor of Statistics and Biostatistics, University of Washington
  • James Pennebaker, Professor of Psychology, University of Texas

More details, including how to register, will be available soon.

MIDAS starting research group on mobile sensor analytics

By | Educational, Events, General Interest, Happenings, News

The Michigan Institute for Data Science (MIDAS) is convening a research working group on mobile sensor analytics. Mobile sensors are taking on an increasing presence in our lives. Wearable devices allow for physiological and cognitive monitoring, and behavior modeling for health maintenance, exercise, sports, and entertainment. Sensors in vehicles measure vehicle kinematics, record driver behavior, and increase perimeter awareness. Mobile sensors are becoming essential in areas such as environmental monitoring and epidemiological tracking.

There are significant data science opportunities for theory and application in mobile sensor analytics, including real-time data collection, streaming data analysis, active on-line learning, mobile sensor networks, and energy efficient mobile computing.

Our working group welcomes researchers with interest in mobile sensor analytics in any scientific domain, including but not limited to health, transportation, smart cities, ecology and the environment.

Where and When:

Noon to 2 pm, April 13, 2017

School of Public Health I, Room 7625

Lunch provided

Agenda:

  • Brief presentations about challenges and opportunities in mobile sensor analytics (theory and application);

  • A brief presentation of a list of funding opportunities;

  • Discussion of research ideas and collaboration in the context of grant application and industry partnership.

Future Plans: Based on the interest of participants, MIDAS will alert researchers to relevant funding opportunities, hold follow-up meetings for continued discussion and team formation as ideas crystalize for grant applications, and work with the UM Business Engagement Center to bring in industry partnership.

Please RSVP.  For questions, please contact Jing Liu, Ph.D, MIDAS research specialist (ljing@umich.edu; 734-764-2750).

Graduate Studies in Computational & Data Sciences Info Session – Central Campus

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2016-06-14 11.13.52Learn about graduate programs that will prepare you for success in computationally intensive fields — pizza and pop provided

  • The Ph.D. in Scientific Computing is open to all Ph.D. students who will make extensive use of large-scale computation, computational methods, or algorithms for advanced computer architectures in their studies. It is a joint degree program, with students earning a Ph.D. from their current departments, “… and Scientific Computing” — for example, “Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering and Scientific Computing.”
  • The Graduate Certificate in Computational Discovery and Engineering trains graduate students in computationally intensive research so they can excel in interdisciplinary HPC-focused research and product development environments. The certificate is open to all students currently pursuing Master’s or Ph.D. degrees at the University of Michigan. This year we will offer a new practicum option through the Multidisciplinary Design Program.
  • The Graduate Certificate in Data Science is focused on developing core proficiencies in data analytics:
    1) Modeling — Understanding of core data science principles, assumptions and applications;
    2) Technology — Knowledge of basic protocols for data management, processing, computation, information extraction, and visualization;
    3) Practice — Hands-on experience with real data, modeling tools, and technology resources.

Graduate Studies in Computational & Data Sciences Info Session – North Campus

By |

2016-06-14 11.13.52Learn about graduate programs that will prepare you for success in computationally intensive fields — pizza and pop provided

  • The Ph.D. in Scientific Computing is open to all Ph.D. students who will make extensive use of large-scale computation, computational methods, or algorithms for advanced computer architectures in their studies. It is a joint degree program, with students earning a Ph.D. from their current departments, “… and Scientific Computing” — for example, “Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering and Scientific Computing.”
  • The Graduate Certificate in Computational Discovery and Engineering trains graduate students in computationally intensive research so they can excel in interdisciplinary HPC-focused research and product development environments. The certificate is open to all students currently pursuing Master’s or Ph.D. degrees at the University of Michigan. This year we will offer a new practicum option through the Multidisciplinary Design Program.
  • The Graduate Certificate in Data Science is focused on developing core proficiencies in data analytics:
    1) Modeling — Understanding of core data science principles, assumptions and applications;
    2) Technology — Knowledge of basic protocols for data management, processing, computation, information extraction, and visualization;
    3) Practice — Hands-on experience with real data, modeling tools, and technology resources.

Graduate programs in computational and data science — informational sessions Sept. 19 & 21

By | Educational, Events, News

Students interested in computational and data science are invited to learn about graduate programs that will prepare them for success in computationally intensive fields. Pizza and pop will be provided.

Two sessions are scheduled:

Monday, Sept. 19, 5 – 6 p.m.
Johnson Rooms, Lurie Engineering Center (North Campus)

Wednesday, Sept. 21, 5 – 6 p.m.
2001 LSA Building (Central Campus)

The sessions will address:

  • The Ph.D. in Scientific Computing, which is open to all Ph.D. students who will make extensive use of large-scale computation, computational methods, or algorithms for advanced computer architectures in their studies. It is a joint degree program, with students earning a Ph.D. from their current departments, “… and Scientific Computing” — for example, “Ph.D. in Aerospace Engineering and Scientific Computing.”
  • The Graduate Certificate in Computational Discovery and Engineering, which trains graduate students in computationally intensive research so they can excel in interdisciplinary HPC-focused research and product development environments. The certificate is open to all students currently pursuing Master’s or Ph.D. degrees at the University of Michigan. This year we will offer a new practicum option through the Multidisciplinary Design Program.
  • The Graduate Certificate in Data Science, which is focused on developing core proficiencies in data analytics:
    1) Modeling — Understanding of core data science principles, assumptions and applications;
    2) Technology — Knowledge of basic protocols for data management, processing, computation, information extraction, and visualization;
    3) Practice — Hands-on experience with real data, modeling tools, and technology resources.

White papers due for MIDAS Challenge Initiatives June 30

By | General Interest, News

The second round of the Michigan Institute for Data Science (MIDAS) Challenge Initiatives is open, with the deadline for initial funding submissions on June 30.

MIDAS is seeking proposals in Data Science for Health Science (download RFP) and Social Science (download RFP).

Proposals will be funded at a level of approximately $1.25M each. A successful research proposal will involve a multi-disciplinary team engaged in research that will both have disruptive impact on a relevant thrust application and significantly advance the methodological foundations of data science. The ultimate intent of the MIDAS challenge initiatives is to stimulate research activities that can be leveraged into successful external funding proposals from government, private foundations, or industry.

For more information, visit the Challenge Initiative RFP page.